Chase Ambushes my Twitter IPO Trade with Poor Customer Service

Chase Bank Logo

Chase Bank Logo (Photo credit: Neubie)

Chase has some processes in place that could apparently use an overhaul. While Karen and T.J. at their Dunwoody branch displayed admirable customer service skills, I’m sorry to say it won’t be enough to save this 10-year Chase customer. I’m really disappointed.

This morning, excited for the Twitter IPO coming tomorrow, I logged on to http://www.chase.com to start my wire transfer to my new E*Trade account. It’s a fairly small transfer; I’m no Wall Street guru; I’m a social media nerd that wants to participate in this monumental happening. Yesterday, I had successfully set up my E*Trade account and done the initial wire transfer necessary to get the account going. So today, I expected no problems. I know that E*Trade requires a few hours to process the transfer to fund my stock purchase. And, tomorrow’s the big day.

Chase’s website gives every indication that my transfer has been completed. I get a lovely confirmation number and all. So, I figure that all should be ok. How exciting. Late this afternoon, while on a conference call, I get a phone call from a toll-free number on my cell phone that I send to voice mail. After my call, I get another call, this time it’s from the nice man at E*Trade, asking if I have any questions. I said “yes, as a matter of fact, I’d like to know how long it takes a wire transfer to post to the account.” He assures me if I completed the transfer early this morning, which I did, it should already be there. I went to log on to my chase account online, and it was… well, it was locked down. I got a message instructing me to call a telephone number. I thought, “Oh no, what is going on? This has never happened in 10 years.” And then the fun really started.

I called the telephone number, and the man said that no information could be given to me over the phone, that I would need to go to a branch in person before access could be restored to my online account. That sounds ominous, right? And, I’m at work, trying to, well, you know… work. But this sounds serious. I mean the wire transfer was really not quite so much, not 5 figures even, so…what could this be? So I gathered my things and raced for the car and on the way, it dawned on me. Chase was concerned the wire transfer was fraudulent. Chase was worried about its money. Then I thought about the voicemail I received earlier and called it. It was Chase. They had activity on the account they wanted to verify. So I called the number and asked if this was linked to my account being locked. The lady said she couldn’t confirm anything and that I’d have to visit the branch and produce 2 forms of ID before any information could be shared. Well, that did it. Now I was angry.

Here I am, excited for my IPO purchase, scheduling my wire transfer online. There is no posted dollar limit to wire transfers. No warning that typing in the wrong number will cause my account to be locked down or blown up. No indication the transfer has not been made. Just a lovely confirmation number. Then more than eight hours later my online account  is locked, I’m being summoned to the bank to produce ID like a criminal. Because Chase was worried about losing its money, calling it protecting me.

So, I leave early and go across town to the closest branch. I have to call my husband and ask him to leave work to get the kids, because there’s no way I’ll be home anywhere near time in this new traffic scenario. When I get to the branch I’m furious, and do my best not to take it out on T.J., the banker that had the misfortune of being available when I walked in the door after 4pm. What did I say? I’ll tell you what I said: “Here are my two forms of ID. It’s really me. Now close all of my accounts, because this is ridiculous. You don’t complete my trade, you don’t bother to tell me for 8 hours, you won’t tell me why and treat me like a criminal and make me come here in person. Well, careful what you wish for, because I’m here in person, and I want my money back. All of it.” Now, is that what you want your customers to say, Chase? Is that worth it? doesn’t it cost much more money to get another me?

But then I realized, if I close my accounts, I still can’t complete my wire transfer. Chase is a HUGE bank. They trade stocks. They can do this trade for me directly, on the house. Save me some trouble. Wait, what’s that? No they can’t? Oh, I have an account, just not the “Right Kind” of account to make that happen. Can they push through the original wire transfer? No, no they can’t do that either. They can just unlock everything they locked and ask me to do it again, myself. Do I have my E*Trade wire information with me? Oh yeah, I carry that around on a piece of paper in my purse. So, after all of this, what I got was a bunch of “we don’t know what happened,” and “we’re really sorry for the inconvenience, but we’re protecting [ourselves while inconveniencing you].” Wow. Great customer service.

Let’s bullet out the customer touch points that went poorly:

  • No indication on the website of any limits on wire transfers (dollar amount, time between transfers, potential blow-up of online access if you guess wrong)
  • Clear confirmation number given that the transaction was complete
  • 8 hour delay in notification of suspected fraud
  • No indication that the wire transfer was cancelled
  • No request for security question and answer when I called for details to be able to provide me some information about what was happening to me
  • No information provided
  • Requirement that I “step in” a branch to produce 2 forms of ID before any information was provided
  • No ability to explain the reason for my inconvenience at the branch
  • No ability to transfer funds for me on site
  • No ability to push the wire transfer through on site
  • No ability to really help me at all

Let’s see how this impacted me:

  • Uncertainty as to whether I can get in on the Twitter IPO before the bell rings tomorrow
  • Fear that someone fraudulently accessed my account
  • Had to leave work early
  • Anger about the inconvenience
  • Was an hour later getting home with traffic
  • Missed bath time with my kids
  • Had to re-do the original wire transfer from the morning
  • Spent time writing a lengthy blog post
  • Will have to talk to the branch manager tomorrow
  • Have to find a new bank that treats me better
  • Have to transfer all my money to some new institution and learn new codes. They probably will be just as bad.
  • Have to tell all my friends that I’ve referred to Chase about my experience
  • Have to be mad at Chase for some period of time

So, as you can see, nobody really wins here. I’ve spent all of my personal time today on this ridiculous evolution. I will say that Chase either hires well or trains well, because Karen, the branch manager, and T.J., my banker, had patience like you wouldn’t believe. I kept apologizing and telling them I know it wasn’t their fault and I was sorry to be so frustrated, and that it wasn’t them. Even the @chasesupport team reached out to me within an hour of me tweeting them, which is great. They said they were sorry and asked if they could help somehow. So clearly there are some good things happening at Chase. But, whatever this was that happened to me today, was not what I’m looking for in a bank.

Chase, let me ask you. This policy, this whatever it is. At this price point, was it worth it? Did your process work? Do many people hack accounts to do wire transfers to E*Trade? Is that what did it? I know you say you’re doing it to help me, but you’re really not. If I dispute this, you’ll fix it for me. You’re doing this for you. And we’re probably going to have to break up because if it.

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3 thoughts on “Chase Ambushes my Twitter IPO Trade with Poor Customer Service

  1. Frankie, I feel your pain. What an aggravating experience. Please post again at some point and let us know how it all turned out.

  2. “Chase was worried about its money.” No actually, Chase was worried about YOUR money. That money is still yours even if it’s in a Chase account. They have all those procedures to protect YOU in the event of fraud. If anything you should be happy that they have those procedures in place. You probably never transfer large sums of money and so it was considered unusual activity. What if a fraud had gotten ahold of your account and tried to wire transfer that amount of money? Wire transfers are one of the easiest ways of committing fraud. And there is no limit on wire transfers, but if someone suddenly transfers a large sum of money and they usually do not do that, it looks incredibly suspicious.

    I agree that they should have contacted you right away, but it’s really not that out of the ordinary for them to want to confirm your identity by asking for 2 forms of ID. It’s standard that they cannot give out any account information unless they confirm your identity, especially when a large sum of money is involved. They want to make sure that you are who you say you are and that you in fact did the transfer. This is to protect YOU and YOUR money. And why in god’s name would you think they could buy stocks all willy nilly for you if you don’t have a brokerage account with them? You can’t trade stocks without a brokerage account, and I’m sure they explained this to you. “Do many people hack accounts to do wire transfers to E*Trade?” Yes. All the time. Otherwise they wouldn’t have these procedures in place. The only valid complaint you have is the 8 hour wait to contact you about suspected fraud.

    • Thanks for the comment, Sarah. I think it helps illustrate that customers can have varying ideas about what good customer service means, and the level of protection one person finds acceptable may feel too restrictive to others. Perhaps the ability to choose could provide a better fit. – Frankie

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