Make it Easy

2001 Atlanta Trip with Wendy

2001 Atlanta Trip with Wendy (Photo credit: dharder9475)

You may have read my last post about Macy’s, and how I love that she texts me to let me know when the sales are happening. Well, recently my love turned colder when I went to return a pair of shoes and a dress. See, I went to return everything at the Calvin Klein counter (because I love Calvin Klein) and I intended to purchase more items after my return was through. But, that dream came to a screaching halt when the sales rep dumped my box upside down on the counter, saw the pair of shoes in the box and said “oh, you’ll have to return those upstairs at the shoe department.” I said “you’re joking.” She said “No ma’am, I’m sorry, shoes wants their shoes returned upstairs.” I thought “Really?” So, you know what I did? I went upstairs and returned both the dress and the shoes to the shoe department, and then left. No shopping at Macy’s.  I took my money to another store to buy my $300 worth of Calvin Klein dresses that same day.

So, what happened there? I’ll tell you. The store has a policy to make things more convenient for the store and less convenient for the customer. This can irritate customers. And though customers may not say in words that they dislike the process, but they can certainly speak with their wallets. That’s why reducing customer effort is so important. Customers will pay a premium to be treated well.

How could the scenario have gone differently? Picture this. I’m walking into my favorite section of Macy’s, the Calvin Klein section. The sales clerk notices how distracted I am by the new dresses and says “Don’t you just love that blue one? We just got those in and everyone has been looking at them. If you like, I can finish this up for you while you go have a look.”  And then a few minutes later I’m pulling out the credit card. Zip zip. Macy’s makes $300 in a few minutes.

So yes, the clerk would have had to put those shoes aside and later someone would have to come retrieve them. But each time we place a barrier in front of our customres, we run the risk that they will walk out the door with their money. Heck, I exerted EXTRA effort to go to a completely different store to spend my money. I was spending money that day, and if Macy’s didn’t want it I was happy to give it to someone else.

Questions to Ask Yourself:

  • Are all the tasks I ask my customer to complete really necessary?
  • Do I ask my customer questions I don’t really need the answer to?
  • Is there a way that I can anticipate the wants/needs of my customer and solve those needs before they have to ask?
  • If I were the customer, how would this feel to me?

In your business, I invite  you to think about the processes you have in place to reduce your own workload. Now, think about whether those barriers could potentially cost you sales. And then decide if there is a way you could change those processes to make things easier on your customer. If I react that way with my beloved Macy’s, I assure you that your customers, equally loyal or less loyal, may do the same to you.

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