Macy’s Anticipates Customer Need

English: Macy's Department Store in New York City.

English: Macy’s Department Store in New York City. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I got a phone call today. From Macy’s. My girl Macy called me to say that the purchase I made online would be shipped in two separate orders to get them here as quickly as possible. You know, just in case I was wondering how I should expect my order to arrive. By the way, this order was prompted by an email that came to my inbox reminding me of the Super Saturday Sale. I was able to click right from the email to the extra 20% off that was calling my name. I say “reminding me” because Macy’s texts me all the time to let me know when sales are happening. Just like a good shopping buddy would.

Wow, did you get all tangled up in my social relationship with my girl Macy? Are you wondering if I feel bothered, irritated or smothered by this? Surprisingly, my answer is no. Because Macy’s is doing a great job anticipating my needs as a consumer. Of course I want to know when Super Saturday is. Of course I like getting a little phone call to let me know they shipped my order in 2 separate packages. And, conveniently, if you don’t feel the same way, you have the ability to opt out of any of these interactions at any time, with easy instructions through each media channel.

I don’t think each company has to go to this level of support; in fact, that may get to be too many phone calls and emails. However, I think what is important is to find the right mix of social support for your customers. Find out what level of service your customers prefer, and in what channels. Then give it to them. Notice how I classify that email from Macy’s alerting me to sales as a customer support practice? On most planets I think people refer to that as marketing. To me, it’s a great service, because I don’t have to check the site or read the newspaper or even watch television to find out about upcoming store events. I just look at texts or emails.

I hope this sparks some ideas. The more we get ahead of customer need instead of running behind it, the better off we’ll be. Need anticipation is a great way to reduce customer effort. So, feel free to put yourself in your customer’s shoes, and see if you can do some of the work for your customer by anticipating their needs. And Macy’s, if you’re listening, keep texting, emailing, and calling. Just don’t tell my husband.

Advertisements