Remember Me

English: Light bulb patent application. Photol...

English: Light bulb patent application. Photolithography reproduction. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I think that of all the things I might dislike about customer service experiences, having to repeat myself is the thing I find most frustrating. Think about how much time it takes to recall whatever your story is to share it with the next new person you are working with in any customer support channel. Face to face at the bank. On the phone with the doctor’s office. At your pharmacy. Your child’s school. By the third time you I relay the same story, I start to think “Is this really worth all the effort?” in my head.

We know that today, customer churn is top of mind. Keeping customers is less expensive than attracting new ones, and we all want the entirety of the customer experience to be great. What makes a great customer experience? In my experience, the interactions I have with companies are what impact my impression of companies I deal with. For example, when I’m sitting at home wondering “when was that gift basket supposed to be delivered?” I immediately think “well, how can I find out? How long would it take to find out? Do I have to call them? Will they answer the phone at 9pm when I have time to call them, and how informed, articulate and generally amenable is the customer service rep that answers the phone? And, all that sounds hard, so do I really have to call? Can I just tweet to @giftsgalorenstuff ‘hey did my basket make it?’

Sound familiar? So how great would it be if, when I reach out to the company, they act like they know me? Can they just (if they can figure it out from my Twitter handle) respond and say “if you’re talking about that chocolate heaven stack sent to Hoboken, it got there 2 hours ago.” Of course, that’s a convenient case where proprietary information isn’t really an issue, and the Twitter handle can be linked back. But more and more customer support-focused social engagement tools have the ability to link internal account information to customer’s social accounts. And hey, even if you can’t fully answer the question, you can still add whatever personal context is prudent to let customers know that you know them and remember them.

How easy is it to tweet a question to the universe and get the right answer? It’s easier than digging through email to find the confirmation email and clicking through to the company’s website, or even clicking the embedded link in the email that takes you directly to tracking information. If service is really the new retention, then shouldn’t the company dig through their records and click a link for me? (lightbulb goes on.) Yes, we have evolved to that place with social I believe. In customer service we used to be able to say “well, if you can find that confirmation number for me, I’ll be happy to look into it for you.” Social media says “Hey Company XYZ, it’s Frankie, where’s my gift basket?” and infers that you, company XYZ, should go find your own confirmation number based on my name. And I think the company that can accomplish that task regularly probably gets the repeat business by reducing customer effort. I know it works for me personally.

So, tomorrow, when you’re dreaming up ways that you can make a huge impact at work, try a little of this. I bet you can change quite a few customer experiences. And it’s probably easier than you think.

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