Speak or Hold Your Peace In Tragedy

Daily Shoot-Condolence Card

Daily Shoot-Condolence Card (Photo credit: NedraI)

I’ve seen several articles online discussing whether a brand should post on social media to offer condolences or thoughts to those that have suffered a loss or tragedy. Without going into detail about who said what or had which opinion, I’d like to simply offer mine.

If the point of social media for business is to personify a brand image, and we are asking our community managers to put their personalities out there for the public, I think it makes sense that if we want to make appropriate posts regarding the tragedy, we should. I think scheduled sales posts should surely stop in impacted areas. If the impacts of the tragedy are broadly felt, then it may make sense to withhold brand posts for the entire customer area. I think that depends on the particular issue.

Here’s why. People that work at companies and provide social media in an impacted area could be feeling the same thing that the community feels, because they ARE the community. They leave work and travel home in cars or on busses or on the subway. Their children attend schools in the area. Their spouses and potentially their extended family also live and work in that area. Refraining from comment on the tragedy certainly doesn’t feel authentic or transparent in those cases.

I think the important thing is to carefully consider whether a post is appropriate and what that post should be. I’ve seen posts say that brands have no feelings and no personality. But I disagree. I disagree because brands are powered by people, and those people have real feelings and thoughts. True, the employees collectively represent the brand and try to convey a message that makes sense with brand objectives. But if we saw a customer in a retail setting, and that customer had suffered a loss, I hope that we would not hesitate before offering our sympathies to that customer. Because though it’s business, the fact that we’re all doing it together should make it personal.

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